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Dare You Eat Vancouver's Top 20 Bad-Ass Meaty Delights?

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Think you're pretty daring when you eat a chicken liver parfait? Or do you claim bragging rights for chowing down that one time on a slice of beef tongue which appeared on a particularly adventurous charcuterie board? Please.
If you want real bragging rights, try a bowl of snake soup followed by a portion of duck chin and rectum calamari. Turns out Vancouver is bursting with extreme cuts of meat - if you only knew where to look. So we asked Fernando Medrano of Wisemonkeys and Christina Tsang of Food: It is More to compile a map of the city's most bad-ass meaty delights. Dive in... If you dare.


· The Five Days of Meat Coverage [EVAN] Read More
Note: Restaurants on this map are listed geographically.

Kingyo Izakaya 金魚居酒屋

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Basashi: Thinly sliced raw horse meat sashimi. Sweet, beef-like flavour. A taboo for the horsey set. [Image via Japantoday.com]

Guu Garden

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Gyu Tongue Chazuke: This unusual cut of beef is extremely, um, beefy in taste. One might not even realize anything is out of the ordinary except for a slight chewiness. The setup for this dish is very cute with a tiny teapot filled with soup for you to pour over the rice, which is served along with the grilled beef tongue.

Wildebeest

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Grilled Veal Tongue & Roasted Veal Sweetbreads: For a non-Asian and more European approach to unusual cuts, Wildebeest is one of the few who dare to have offal on their menu. Pair with one of Josh Pape's dynamite cocktail creations to add necessary Dutch courage.

Campagnolo Roma

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"Quinto Quarto" Dinners: Italian for "the Fifth Quarter" alluding to the delicious parts of the animal that shouldn't go to waste, Campagnolo Roma's "Quinto Quarto" dinner is nine courses of offal - beef tongue, duck gizzard, calf liver, and other assorted meats. Look for these special dinners as tickets sell out fast.

Grand Dynasty Seafood Restaurant at the Grand Villa Casino

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Snake Soup: Snake is usually served in late fall and winter at most high-end Chinese restaurant since the Chinese believe it has a medicinal property to help warm the body. Traditionally served in a thicker soup, the snake meat is shredded and ends up looking -and tasting- like chicken. Also keep an eye out for other snake dishes such as snake stew served in a clay pot (a.k.a. snake hot pot but not the kind from Landmark Hot Pot House) on the specials menu. However, since it’s a seasonal item, it is best to call ahead to make sure the restaurant is serving snake for the season.

Alvin Garden

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Fire Exploded Kidneys: Head to Burnaby for this Sichuan classic - cross-hatch sliced kidneys fried with spicy chilis in a very hot wok. 

S & W Pepper House

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Pork Bung AKA "Rectum Calamari": stewed in a fiery hot chili oil. Not for the faint of heart; spicy and deep with, um, a porky flavour that kicks you in the ass. 

Rose Garden

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Pan Fried Duck Chin in Maggie Soy Sauce: Ducks have chins? It is the lower part of the duck’s bill that’s attached to the neck that’s being served so I guess that’s a chin. This dish is found on the dinner & late night menu; it’s mostly bone with just a small amount of meat - a lot of work for little pay off, kind of like chicken feet at dim sum. But you do get to suck on the spicy sauce.

Sea Harbour Seafood Restaurant

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Roasted Squab: Squab served at Chinese restaurants is actually young domesticated pigeon. With its crispy skin and juicy meat, roasted squab looks like a mini-chicken but its meat is more similar to duck. If this seems tame, one can increase the “fear factor” quotient by sucking on the roasted squab head, which is traditionally served as a garnish. [Image via Veronica/Flickr]

Hou Lok Restaurant

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Chicken Balls: Not your father's Chicken Balls. These are not the deepfried sweet and sour take-out classic. These are actually testicles served hot-pot style with sides of other assorted meats and vegetables.

Pinpin Restaurant

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Sizzling Sisig: Sisig looks like plain ground pork served with onions on a sizzling hot plate but it’s actually comprised of cuts from the pig’s head (cheek, jowl, ear etc). That‘s right, you are enjoying sizzling pig face when you are eating sisig. This dish from the Philippines is rumored to come about when locals were able to obtain pig heads very cheaply from the U.S. air base in Angeles City since the Americans wanted no part of eating of it.

Landmark Hot Pot House 春秋火鍋

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Pig Uteri & Other Pig Offal: Yes, uteri is the plural form of uterus and a special item on Landmark’s hotpot menu. If uterus is just Too Much Weird, then one can instead go for pig stomach & pepper soup as their hotpot base, and try pig’s skin, kidney and liver instead. What? That's not weirder, is it? [Image via Alpha/Flickr]

Kwong Chow Congee & Noodle House

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Duck Tongue: Did you know duck tongue has bones? You would think that they could do more than just quack with that kind of articulation. Simmered in a soy sauce and rice wine braise until tender so the meat and cartilage separate easily from the bones, the tongues become little ducky flavour bombs in your mouth. Don't worry about being discreet as you spit the bones out onto a side plate hopefully stripped clean of all the meat. [Image via watchfreeks.com]

Congee Noodle House 粥麵館

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Ostrich Congee: Congee Noodle House's popular 'da lang' (late night menu) is a treasure trove of interesting small unusual dishes. The Ostrich Congee consists of thickly sliced ostrich breast meat (tasting of a cross between chicken and beef) in a bowl of creamy congee. Order it with some Chinese donuts for dipping. [Image via Yelp]
Corazon Antichuchos: Corazon is beef heart and this cut of meat is considered a poor man’s steak. Corazon is one of the most popular types of antichuhos (meat kebab) in Peru. Much like beef tongue, it has a strong beefy flavour in comparison to a regular cut of beef and only the texture may give it away as an unusual cut.

Les Faux Bourgeois

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Salade De Gesiers: The French enjoy offal too and what’s more French than confit? This salad features Confit duck gizzards. [Image via Amy Ross/Flickr]

Peaceful Restaurant 和平饭店

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Beef Tendon Salad: Sichuan cuisine is known for its array of cold meat dishes that start every grand meal. Thinly sliced beef tendons -which provide more texture than flavour - become a carrier for a chili-oil and cilantro dressing.  [Image via YVRBro/Flickr]

The Farmer’s Apprentice

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Sweetbreads Served With Toasted Oats: one of chef David Gunawan's stellar creations, sweetbreads (thymus or pancreas) teamed with oats.

Al Watan Tandoori

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Brain Masala (Maghaz Masala): Al-Watan is a little Pakistani hole-in-the-wall in Fraser Street's diverse South Hill neighbourhood. This classic dish is made by stewing lamb brain in spicy masala sauce until soft like scrambled eggs. Order it with rice and naan. [Image via Leon Brocard/Flickr]

Zakkushi Charcoal Grill

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Chicken Liver, Gizzard & Heart Yakitori & Deep Fried Chicken Gizzard: Japanese meat on a stick is great way to try chicken offal unadulterated. If the yakitori is too scary, the deep fried chicken gizzard is another way to go. These crispy nuggets will more or less look and taste like a Japanese version of the popular mainstream popcorn chicken.

Kingyo Izakaya 金魚居酒屋

Basashi: Thinly sliced raw horse meat sashimi. Sweet, beef-like flavour. A taboo for the horsey set. [Image via Japantoday.com]

Guu Garden

Gyu Tongue Chazuke: This unusual cut of beef is extremely, um, beefy in taste. One might not even realize anything is out of the ordinary except for a slight chewiness. The setup for this dish is very cute with a tiny teapot filled with soup for you to pour over the rice, which is served along with the grilled beef tongue.

Wildebeest

Grilled Veal Tongue & Roasted Veal Sweetbreads: For a non-Asian and more European approach to unusual cuts, Wildebeest is one of the few who dare to have offal on their menu. Pair with one of Josh Pape's dynamite cocktail creations to add necessary Dutch courage.

Campagnolo Roma

"Quinto Quarto" Dinners: Italian for "the Fifth Quarter" alluding to the delicious parts of the animal that shouldn't go to waste, Campagnolo Roma's "Quinto Quarto" dinner is nine courses of offal - beef tongue, duck gizzard, calf liver, and other assorted meats. Look for these special dinners as tickets sell out fast.

Grand Dynasty Seafood Restaurant at the Grand Villa Casino

Snake Soup: Snake is usually served in late fall and winter at most high-end Chinese restaurant since the Chinese believe it has a medicinal property to help warm the body. Traditionally served in a thicker soup, the snake meat is shredded and ends up looking -and tasting- like chicken. Also keep an eye out for other snake dishes such as snake stew served in a clay pot (a.k.a. snake hot pot but not the kind from Landmark Hot Pot House) on the specials menu. However, since it’s a seasonal item, it is best to call ahead to make sure the restaurant is serving snake for the season.

Alvin Garden

Fire Exploded Kidneys: Head to Burnaby for this Sichuan classic - cross-hatch sliced kidneys fried with spicy chilis in a very hot wok. 

S & W Pepper House

Pork Bung AKA "Rectum Calamari": stewed in a fiery hot chili oil. Not for the faint of heart; spicy and deep with, um, a porky flavour that kicks you in the ass. 

Rose Garden

Pan Fried Duck Chin in Maggie Soy Sauce: Ducks have chins? It is the lower part of the duck’s bill that’s attached to the neck that’s being served so I guess that’s a chin. This dish is found on the dinner & late night menu; it’s mostly bone with just a small amount of meat - a lot of work for little pay off, kind of like chicken feet at dim sum. But you do get to suck on the spicy sauce.

Sea Harbour Seafood Restaurant

Roasted Squab: Squab served at Chinese restaurants is actually young domesticated pigeon. With its crispy skin and juicy meat, roasted squab looks like a mini-chicken but its meat is more similar to duck. If this seems tame, one can increase the “fear factor” quotient by sucking on the roasted squab head, which is traditionally served as a garnish. [Image via Veronica/Flickr]

Hou Lok Restaurant

Chicken Balls: Not your father's Chicken Balls. These are not the deepfried sweet and sour take-out classic. These are actually testicles served hot-pot style with sides of other assorted meats and vegetables.

Pinpin Restaurant

Sizzling Sisig: Sisig looks like plain ground pork served with onions on a sizzling hot plate but it’s actually comprised of cuts from the pig’s head (cheek, jowl, ear etc). That‘s right, you are enjoying sizzling pig face when you are eating sisig. This dish from the Philippines is rumored to come about when locals were able to obtain pig heads very cheaply from the U.S. air base in Angeles City since the Americans wanted no part of eating of it.

Landmark Hot Pot House 春秋火鍋

Pig Uteri & Other Pig Offal: Yes, uteri is the plural form of uterus and a special item on Landmark’s hotpot menu. If uterus is just Too Much Weird, then one can instead go for pig stomach & pepper soup as their hotpot base, and try pig’s skin, kidney and liver instead. What? That's not weirder, is it? [Image via Alpha/Flickr]

Kwong Chow Congee & Noodle House

Duck Tongue: Did you know duck tongue has bones? You would think that they could do more than just quack with that kind of articulation. Simmered in a soy sauce and rice wine braise until tender so the meat and cartilage separate easily from the bones, the tongues become little ducky flavour bombs in your mouth. Don't worry about being discreet as you spit the bones out onto a side plate hopefully stripped clean of all the meat. [Image via watchfreeks.com]

Congee Noodle House 粥麵館

Ostrich Congee: Congee Noodle House's popular 'da lang' (late night menu) is a treasure trove of interesting small unusual dishes. The Ostrich Congee consists of thickly sliced ostrich breast meat (tasting of a cross between chicken and beef) in a bowl of creamy congee. Order it with some Chinese donuts for dipping. [Image via Yelp]